Latest Tweets:

"I haven’t seen too many around lately. Things have been tough lately for dreamers. They say dreaming is dead, no one does it anymore. It’s not dead it’s just that it’s been forgotten, removed from our language. Nobody teaches it so nobody knows it exists. The dreamer is banished to obscurity. Well, I’m trying to change all that, and I hope you are too. By dreaming, every day. Dreaming with our hands and dreaming with our minds. Our planet is facing the greatest problems it’s ever faced, ever. So whatever you do, don’t be bored, this is absolutely the most exciting time we could have possibly hoped to be alive. And things are just starting."

(Source: towerandbishop)

"In fairy tales, monsters exist to be a manifestation of something that we need to understand, not only a problem we need to overcome, but also they need to represent, much like angels represent the beautiful, pure, eternal side of the human spirit, monsters need to represent a more tangible, more mortal side of being human: aging, decay, darkness and so forth. And I believe that monsters originally, when we were cavemen and you know, sitting around a fire, we needed to explain the birth of the sun and the death of the moon and the phases of the moon and rain and thunder. And we invented creatures that made sense of the world: a serpent that ate the sun, a creature that ate the moon, a man in the moon living there, things like that. And as we became more and more sophisticated and created sort of a social structure, the real enigmas started not to be outside. The rain and the thunder were logical now. But the real enigmas became social. All those impulses that we were repressing: cannibalism, murder, these things needed an explanation. The sex drive, the need to hunt, the need to kill, these things then became personified in monsters. Werewolves, vampires, ogres, this and that. I feel that monsters are here in our world to help us understand it. They are an essential part of a fable."

Guillermo Del Toro (via iwearthecheeseyo)

(via amelior8or)

(Source: for-all-the-flowers, via se-ouli)

fin-gets-clever-in-latin:

THE GIFSET I’VE BEEN WAITING MY ENTIRE LIFE FOR.

(via cherryblue)

le-claire-de-lune:

I’d rather teen girls reading nothing but terribly written fanfics about their favorite OTPs that express healthy and emotionally-sound romantic relationships than “great literature” that teaches them they are prizes to be won or creatures to be controlled or destroyed. 

(via amelior8or)

onedollarmahh:

hero-honeylemon:

royalturkeyz:

setting realistic goals for my future

image

And he fucking gets his castle

Unlike Hans

OHHHHH OH OHHH OHHHHH

(Source: pandoricaponds, via cherryblue)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Photographs and Watercolors Merge in Surreal Paintings by Aliza Razell

Using self-portrait photographs and watercolors, artist Aliza Razell has been exploring several abstract narratives by merging the two mediums in Photoshop. Her first series, Anesidora , involves the story of Pandora’s Jar (Pandora’s box was actually a jar, a detail misinterpreted in the 1400s), while the second is inspired by the Finnish word ikävä, meaning the feeling of missing someone or something. You can see much more of her work over on Flickr, and you might interested to know Razell is the older sister of young photgorapher Fiddle Oak, featured here last year.

(via amelior8or)

rvya:

that’s it. that’s the whole show.

(Source: orangeskins, via cherryblue)